Summer drought leaves Christmas tree tradition in danger

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Summer drought leaves Christmas tree tradition in danger

Now that Thanksgiving is over, many turn to celebrate Christmas. However, Christmas trees might be in short supply this year.Getting the Christmas tree is a post-Thanksgiving tradition for many families. The Steenstrups skipped the outlet malls. Instead, they scoured Turkey Hill Farm in Haverhill for the perfect tree, and cut it down themselves.”You want symmetry,” said Isabella Steenstrup. “Just go for one that’s not weird looking.”However, the trees themselves are suffering after the hot, dry summer. There are dozens of dead trees on the farm. Christmas tree farmers typically see more customers than they have trees, and with the summer drought, they’re worried about what this means for production. Not just this year but for years to come.Growers say they’re keeping an eye on the Christmas trees that survived the summer drought hoping to find a solution that keeps this holiday tradition going.

Now that Thanksgiving is over, many turn to celebrate Christmas. However, Christmas trees might be in short supply this year.

Getting the Christmas tree is a post-Thanksgiving tradition for many families. The Steenstrups skipped the outlet malls. Instead, they scoured Turkey Hill Farm in Haverhill for the perfect tree, and cut it down themselves.

“You want symmetry,” said Isabella Steenstrup. “Just go for one that’s not weird looking.”

However, the trees themselves are suffering after the hot, dry summer. There are dozens of dead trees on the farm.

Christmas tree farmers typically see more customers than they have trees, and with the summer drought, they’re worried about what this means for production. Not just this year but for years to come.

Growers say they’re keeping an eye on the Christmas trees that survived the summer drought hoping to find a solution that keeps this holiday tradition going.



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