Women form squad with a mission to track down missing pets

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A squad of five women from Colorado has made it their mission to track down missing pets — no matter how far — and reunite them with their owners.Renae Bagwell and Barb Sebring are two of the five “petfinders” who work to circulate hundreds of flyers, search lost pet listings and contact animal shelters in the Denver area whenever a pet is missing. “I would say a lot of them are stolen, a lot of the ones that we’re looking for,” Sebring told KUSA. The squad even sets traps in areas where missing dogs or cats have been seen and can monitor them remotely.”At least 80% of the time when there’s a trap, you know that dog will go in,” Sebring said.Bagwell said time is precious when it comes to missing pets, especially dogs. “One of the biggest things I learned is the fact that dogs can go feral,” she said. “It’s like once they’re lost long enough, they don’t even recognize their owners.”Members of this pet-finding squad go to extreme measures to track down furry loved ones and do it all for free.”I mean I took a stick with me, but afterwards I am thinking, oh my God, nobody knows I’m in here,” Sebring said. Bagwell estimates the group has found thousands of pets since their mission began. “I always remember the ones I can’t find,” she said. The pet finders say their work is rewarding. “Once you start doing this stuff, though and you get a match. It’s very addictive. It’s like a calling,” Sebring said.For Bagwell, pet finding was a way to heal after her husband died and she was grieving during quarantine in 2020. “It was just heartbreaking. Nobody could come in. I was isolated and I think it did help me. I think it really did help,” she said.

A squad of five women from Colorado has made it their mission to track down missing pets — no matter how far — and reunite them with their owners.

Renae Bagwell and Barb Sebring are two of the five “petfinders” who work to circulate hundreds of flyers, search lost pet listings and contact animal shelters in the Denver area whenever a pet is missing.

“I would say a lot of them are stolen, a lot of the ones that we’re looking for,” Sebring told KUSA.

The squad even sets traps in areas where missing dogs or cats have been seen and can monitor them remotely.

“At least 80% of the time when there’s a trap, you know that dog will go in,” Sebring said.

Bagwell said time is precious when it comes to missing pets, especially dogs.

“One of the biggest things I learned is the fact that dogs can go feral,” she said. “It’s like once they’re lost long enough, they don’t even recognize their owners.”

Members of this pet-finding squad go to extreme measures to track down furry loved ones and do it all for free.

“I mean I took a stick with me, but afterwards I am thinking, oh my God, nobody knows I’m in here,” Sebring said.

Bagwell estimates the group has found thousands of pets since their mission began.

“I always remember the ones I can’t find,” she said.

The pet finders say their work is rewarding.

“Once you start doing this stuff, though and you get a match. It’s very addictive. It’s like a calling,” Sebring said.

For Bagwell, pet finding was a way to heal after her husband died and she was grieving during quarantine in 2020.

“It was just heartbreaking. Nobody could come in. I was isolated and I think it did help me. I think it really did help,” she said.



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