Nature

  • Could this one-time ‘epigenetic’ treatment control cholesterol?

    Download the Nature Podcast 28 February 2024 In this episode: 00:49 What caused the Universe to become fully transparent? Around 13 billion years ago, the Universe was filled with a dense ‘fog’ of neutral hydrogen that blocked certain wavelengths of light. This fog was lifted when the hydrogen was hit by radiation in a process known as reionisation, but the…

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  • Why a publisher retracted abortion-pill studies cited in a case set for the Supreme Court

    A physician at a clinic in New Mexico watches as a person takes the abortion pill mifepristone in 2023.Credit: Evelyn Hockstein/Reuters Early this month, a scientific publisher retracted two studies1,2 cited by a federal judge in Texas when he ruled that the abortion pill mifepristone should be taken off the market, suggesting that the drug causes a burden on the…

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  • To unravel the origin of life, treat findings as pieces of a bigger puzzle

    The origin of life is one of the greatest challenges in science. It transcends conventional disciplinary boundaries, yet has been approached from within those confines for generations. Not surprisingly, these traditions have emphasized different aspects of the question. Or rather, questions. The origin of life is really an extended continuum from the simplest prebiotic chemistry to the first reproducing cells,…

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  • The first bulk ceramic that deforms like a metal at room temperature

    RESEARCH BRIEFINGS 23 February 2024 An innovative high-strength ceramic consists of interlocked, nanometre-scale plates in which stacked layers of the material are twisted relative to each other. It can deform at room temperature without fracturing instantly — thereby achieving a long-standing goal for materials scientists. Source link

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  • How we boosted female faculty numbers in male-dominated departments

    Sponsor message 00:00 This Working Scientist podcast series is sponsored by the University of Queensland, where research is addressing some of the world’s most challenging and complex problems. Take your research further at UQ. Visit uq.edu.au Juliana Gil: 00:25 Hello, this is How to Save Humanity in 17 Goals, a podcast brought to you by Nature Careers in partnership with…

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  • Save lives in the next pandemic: ensure vaccine equity now

    Since 2022, member states of the World Health Organization (WHO) have been negotiating a new treaty — provisionally termed the Pandemic Agreement. If adopted, it would transform how the world handles pandemic prevention, preparedness and response. Opinions differ on what negotiators should prioritize. But no issue has captivated public attention as much as vaccine equity — or done more to…

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  • First private Moon lander touches down on lunar surface to make history

    The spacecraft Odysseus passes over the Moon on 21 February on its way a successful landing on 22 February.Credit: Intuitive Machines/NASA CLPS In a historic lunar accomplishment, the first private spacecraft to land successfully on the Moon touched down on 22 February. The spacecraft, named Odysseus and built by Intuitive Machines in Houston, Texas, also became the first US lunar…

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  • Directive giant upconversion by supercritical bound states in the continuum

    Theory In the section ‘TCMT: critical coupling for an isolated mode’, the local field enhancement at critical coupling for an isolated resonant mode is demonstrated. In the section ‘Open-resonator TCMT’, the non-Hermitian Hamiltonian formalism of TCMT for FW-BIC formation is used. It will be shown that, as the asymptotic condition of BIC cannot be ideally reached, the FW quasi-BIC originates…

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  • Generative AI’s environmental costs are soaring — and mostly secret

    Last month, OpenAI chief executive Sam Altman finally admitted what researchers have been saying for years — that the artificial intelligence (AI) industry is heading for an energy crisis. It’s an unusual admission. At the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, Altman warned that the next wave of generative AI systems will consume vastly more power than expected,…

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  • Ancient bronze hand’s inscription points to origins of Basque language

    Inscriptions carved on a 2,100-year-old bronze hand might be the earliest written example of the language that gave rise to modern Basque1, archaeologists say. Access options Access Nature and 54 other Nature Portfolio journals Get Nature+, our best-value online-access subscription $29.99 / 30 days cancel any time Subscribe to this journal Receive 51 print issues and online access $199.00 per year only…

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